Stonecutters, stone masons and stone carvers - some Irish sources

As we record grave memorials throughout the country we come across the names of the stonecarvers and cutters who made them. Sometimes a signature (in full or initials) is found below the upper carvings and sometimes at the base of the stone. We have come across Bolster, Beary, Keane and Dack, amongst many others, and as the project develops we will pursue other historic sources to research these tradesmen. Read more »

Qr Codes in Historic Graveyards

QR codes are square barcodes which when scanned with a smartphone open a webpage. You need a QR code generator and a QR code reader to make it work. A funeral director in Dorset, England, is now offering to add QR codes to grave memorials for £95 and has garnered a lot of media interest as a result. Read more »

Pioneers in Irish Graveyard Recording - Robert M Chapple

This blog post is one of a series about people who have been working in historic graveyard research in Ireland. Previously we wrote about Dr. Jane Lyons (http://historicgraves.ie/blog/miscellanea/pioneers-irish-graveyard-recording-dr-jane-lyons) who pioneered publishing graveyard data to the internet while this post is about archaeologist Robert M Chapple. Read more »

A Happy Encounter at Inch, Co. Cork

We have over 10,000 grave memorials recorded in the last year and we have to move servers very soon as we are topping 30GB of online data. Our work is fascinating and rewarding every day and today we got an email to say thanks to one of our volunteer partners (take a bow lads http://historicgraves.ie/graveyard/inch/co-inch) and thanks to SECAD for supporting the project. Read more »

Headstones and stories from Abington, Murroe, Limerick - 'If Virtue be a Blessing Great'

Following yesterdays storm we started work in Abington graveyard this morning. We are training members of  the Murroe community (http://www.murroe.net/) to survey and record their historic graveyards as part of the Ballyhoura Historic Graves Project (http://visitballyhoura.com/index.php/home/) funded by LEADER. About a month ago we worked together in Clonkeen (http://historicgraves.ie/graveyard/clonkeen/li-clkn) graveyard and now we have reached the flagship graveyard of Abington (http://historicgraves.ie/graveyard/abington/li-abgn). Read more »

The Gathering rolls into Roscommon

There was a huge turnout in Roscommon last night for the first of the Gathering Ireland community events. These events will be taking place in every county in Ireland over the coming months and are an opportunity for the gathering team to spread the message about what the gathering is and for communities to learn how to become involved and to generate ideas for local gatherings across the country.

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Pioneers in Irish Graveyard Recording - Dr. Jane Lyons

Earlier this year we met Dr. Jane Lyons of www.from-ireland.net one of the most valuable sources of Irish genealogical data on the internet. Dr. Lyons has shared some of her memorial transcriptions from Aghaboe in Laois (http://historicgraves.ie/sites/default/files/pdf-uploads/surveys/1693/aghaboejanelyonstranscriptions.pdf) with us and the record augments that made by the local community group in the course of a workshop in 2011.

Dr. Lyons pioneered the publication of Irish grave memorial photographs on the internet and finding her photographs (http://www.flickr.com/photos/59366723@N07/tags/gravestone/) on flickr was very encouraging in 2009. Besides publishing so many rare datasets Dr. Lyons also offers a genealogical research service at http://www.from-ireland.net/genealogy-research-service/#display.

St Canice's Cathedral in Kilkenny

The Historic Graves project recently had a meeting in the Heritage Council Offices in Kilkenny which are nestled in the fabulously restored 14th century Bishop’s Palace building just outside the boundary wall surrounding St Canice’s Cathedral. I was early for the meeting and took the opportunity to explore the graveyard surrounding St Canice’s. By the time I ventured inside the cathedral it was close to closing for lunch but the nice lady manning the desk let me in for free to have a quick look around.  Read more »

How to draw a sketch plan of an historic graveyard

Grave plots are generally three feet wide and six feet long. Most grave plots are arranged in rows. The very first thing when recording an historic graveyard is to identify the row arrangements. Be patient and let the patterns reveal themselves - we prefer to find the straightest row (often along a boundary wall) and start there. Then we number the memorials (using strips of masking tape with numbers stuck to the back of the memorials) and sketch the relative location of the memorials. With practice, surprisingly accurate plans can be drawn. We have been using A4 ruled pages for the drawings but Robin Turk has just designed a new template sheet for the plans. Read more »

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